National Disability Leadership Alliance

NDLA logo

Americans with Disabilities Demand that Democrats Support their Fundamental Right to Live In Freedom in the Democratic National Platform

The National Disability Leadership Alliance (NDLA) is extremely disappointed that the Democratic Party’s Platform Committee failed to join with the Disability Community in calling for Federal civil rights legislation to assure that Americans with disabilities and older Americans are able to receive Long Term Services and Supports (LTSS) in the community, rather than be forced into unwanted institutionalization.  NDLA urges the Democratic Party to amend its platform to endorse legislation ensuring that every American with a disability has the right to a meaningful choice in where we live and where we receive services and supports.

The Disability Community has been working to address this issue for more than 25 years, most recently securing needed changes in the Affordable Care Act to encourage states to provide LTSS in the community.  However, few states have taken advantage of those changes and virtually all still restrict access to community-based services, forcing Americans with disabilities into nursing facilities and other institutions.

Additionally, although the Supreme Court ruled in Olmstead v. L.C. that under the Americans with Disabilities Act such institutionalization is illegal, that ruling has failed to ensure that all individuals have the opportunity to live and receive services in their own homes in the community.

In the past year, Senator Schumer (D-NY) and Congressman Gibson (R-NY-19) have introduced the Disability Integration Act (DIA), bi-partisan civil rights legislation establishing that disabled people have the right to live and receive services in the community.  The existing system of long-term services and supports is plagued with ableist bias against the independence and equality of people with disabilities and in favor of institutions which segregate our people and prevent us from living as equal participants in our own country. The Disability Integration Act overturns that bias by establishing in Federal statute our fundamental right to liberty, promised in the Declaration of Independence, secured by the Constitution, and yet still denied to many older Americans and Americans with disabilities.

NDLA, and organizations throughout the Disability Community, commend the Democratic Party for including a provision in the Platform calling for an end to subminimum wages paid to people with disabilities. Disabled workers who are paid subminimum wages in sheltered workshops deserve equal protections under labor law, but the failure to include any reference to the right of disabled individuals to live in the community suggests that some Americans can be “too disabled” to deserve equality.

With both Secretary Clinton and Senator Sanders supporting the Disability Integration Act, as well as over 400 disability organizations, disability rights advocates believed the issue – if not the specific legislation – would be addressed in the Democratic Platform.  Instead, the Democratic Party Platform Committee ignored the Disability Community on this critical civil rights issue, and rather than joining with the Disability Community on this fundamental issue of freedom and civil rights, the Platform perpetuates an ableist view of disabled people, even suggesting that people with LTSS disabilities are burdens to their families.

This is a historic moment in the Disability Rights movement, and we urge the Democratic Party not to let this moment pass by in silence, but to join with us in bringing the promise of Liberty to all Americans – including those with LTSS disabilities.

SIGN ON TO NDLA's ORGANIZATIONAL LETTER! 
http://cdrnys.org/advocacy/the-platforms-of-both-major-parties-must-support-the-integration-and-civil-rights-of-disabled-people/

View the list of organizations who have already signed on: http://cdrnys.org/advocacy/ndla-supporter-list/

Read the sign on letter to Democrats: http://www.disabilityleadership.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=176&Itemid=2

Read the sign on letter to Republicans: http://www.disabilityleadership.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=177&Itemid=2

INDIVIDUALS CAN SIGN THIS PETITION! 
http://cqrcengage.com/cdrnys/app/sign-petition?1&engagementId=230575#.V4f0SOaKpgU.facebook

On Mass Shooting and Mental Disability

Andrew PBy This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Disability & Politics

You're a disability activist. Maybe you’ve been involved for years; maybe you’re just learning about disability issues. Either way, you might be wondering how to respond to the terrible shootings in Orlando.

What do you say when politicians, journalists … and probably your family and friends … say that of course mental disability is a major cause of these kinds of mass public shootings?

Nothing But Questions

Andrew PBy This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Disability & Politics

The Primary debates are over. So, where are we now?

Unless serious weirdness breaks out at the Republican Convention, we pretty much know Donald Trump will be the Republican nominee. And it’s still a bit early, and wounds in the party are still raw, but it already looks like Trump will get at least superficial support from the party bigwigs.

Undecided: 9th Democratic PResidential Debate

Andrew PBy This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Disability & Politics

Tweet by Alex Burns, NYT -- “Theatrical stuff aside, @CNN debate is an excellent distillation of the most important differences between the candidates.”

By the end, I was doubting even that. Watching this debate was unpleasant. Clinton and Sanders have clashed and gotten personal before, but not like this. As Paul Begala of CNN said afterwards, these two candidates are clearly “done with each other.” 

Deepish Thoughts From A Contentious Debate: 8th Democratic Presidential Debate

Andrew PBy This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Disability & Politics

Maybe it’s me. Maybe I’m burned out on debates. There were moments during Wednesday night’s Democratic Presidential debate when I wanted to shove an ice pick into my left ear, just for a bit of distraction.

It was still a more issue-centered, substantive debate than many we have seen, but only because both Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton tried to steer things back to real issues, while the moderators took every opportunity to bait them with accusations of inconsistency and hypocrisy.

A Bit of Republican Tone Policing: 12th Republican Presidential Debate

Andrew PBy This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Disability & Politics

The last Republican Presidential Primary debate stood out from all the others in one respect: tone.

It was obvious from the very start. The Republican Party Chairman gave a surreal address to the crowd … and, presumably, the candidates … reminding them to behave themselves if they want to beat the Democrats in the Fall. It seemed like the candidates heard and listened. While they did tear into each other again later in the debate, the debate itself was much more substantive and far more calm. Trump, in particular, showed that he is fully able to deliver his message without yelling and without obvious, up-front contempt for his rivals … when it suits him. It’s all relative of course, but the difference was dramatic, and lasted pretty much through the whole event.

Just Stop It: 7th Democratic Presidential Debate

Andrew PBy This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Disability & Politics

It took me longer than usual to write this post about Sunday’s Democratic debate. I thought I knew what I wanted to say shortly after the debate ended, but then I went to bed. I woke up the next morning to find two very different worlds of Internet comment about one aspect of what was, in general, a pretty good debate.

Page 1 of 8

  • «
  •  Start 
  •  Prev 
  •  1 
  •  2 
  •  3 
  •  4 
  •  5 
  •  6 
  •  7 
  •  8 
  •  Next 
  •  End 
  • »